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Where is my land
We Will Wait No Longer For What Is Ours
ERASE THE WEALTH GAP
Inheritance Belongs To Those Who Built This Land
The movement is now
What Was Thought To Be Impossible Is Now Happening
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The Where Is My Land Movement helps Black families reclaim stolen land through advocacy, research, and technology.

ADVOCACY

The Where Is My Land Movement supports Black families and descendants in their journeys to reclaim land through community organizing, policy advocacy, and coalition building.

RESEARCH

We conduct research to help families prove land ownership and calculate wealth lost over time. Our research efforts educate the public by shining a light on hidden stories of land theft from Black Americans.

TECHNOLOGY

We leverage available data, including genealogical records, legal and property documents, and media reports, to create a tool that helps families find connections to stolen lands.

JUSTICE FOR BRUCE'S BEACH

Learn more about the landmark case that inspired the Where Is My Land movement.

IT'S TIME TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

RECLAIMING STOLEN LAND

Every dollar you donate will be put in service to our effort to help Black Americans locate stolen land and secure restitution.

BECOME PART OF THE MOVEMENT

Become part of the Where Is My Land movement and get updates on one of the most significant efforts to restore stolen land to Black families.

MEET OUR CO-FOUNDERS

Kavon Ward, spearheaded the community effort to compel Los Angeles County to return the land known as “Bruce’s Beach” in Manhattan Beach, CA to the descendants of the rightful owners, Willa and Charles Bruce. She holds a BA in Communications and a Masters in Public Administration, and is a former public policy lobbyist and Congressional Black Caucus Fellow.

Ashanti Martin is veteran communications specialist focusing on the intersection of communication, technology, and Black culture. Her Sunday NY Times article about Linkedin galvanized a movement to transform the workplace experience for Black and other marginalized communities. She has an M.A. in Communications, has worked for the Wharton School, and hosts the podcast, EdUp Explained.

SAY THEIR NAMES

George Floyd, 46

Rayshard Brooks, 27

Daniel Prude, 41

Breonna Taylor, 26

Atatiana Jefferson, 28

Aura Rosser, 40

Stephon Clark, 22

Botham Jean, 26

Philando Castile, 32

Alton Sterling, 37

Michelle Cusseaux, 50

Freddie Gray, 25